Graduate Students

Our doctoral students are the key to our scientific productivity.
They are the next generation of researchers, mentors, and teachers.

Oscar Sandoval

Oscar Sandoval

BS, Neuroscience - University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP)

Joined Fall 2021

I previously worked in a behavioral pharmacology laboratory where I led two projects exploring the effects of probiotic supplements on sensitivity of rats to drugs. My interest have now shifted to researching the neuropharmacological effects of tryptamines such as psilocybin. With my background in pharmacology from UTEP and my knowledge about the microbiome, I hope to investigate the interaction between the gut microbiome and the effects of tryptamines. Aside from research, I enjoy playing the violin both classically and folk mariachi style. I enjoy playing futbol (soccer) on the weekends.

Shannon Thompson

Shannon Thompson

BS/BA, Psychology/Biology - University of New Mexico

Joined Fall 2017

My previous experiences in neuroscience include Discrimination Reversal testing with touch screen, Attention Set Shifting Task in mice for behavioral flexibility, and Object Place Paired Association and Morris Water Maze to understand spatial navigation on rats all of which are designed to look at learning and memory and the circuits that underlay the processes. I hope to continue that research in learning and memory with a focus in alcohol addiction and impairment research so that I can take that knowledge and teaching skill I will gain here at Miami back to New Mexico, at some point, and help improve the educational base there. I also am a third degree black belt in Karate, Japanese sword and naginata practitioner, moviemaker and armature artist who loves all things vampire.

Jordan Hinegardner-Hendricks

Jordan Hinegardner-Hendricks

BS, Biology and Neuroscience - Miami University c/o 2021

Joined 2021

My research career began just before my freshman year of college, when I worked with a family practice physician analyzing some questionnaire data she collects from her patients. That experience ignited a passion in research for me, and in the years since I have been able to deepen my involvement. My sophomore year, I began working in the McMurray lab; originally, I worked with Dani Tapp on various projects, but my junior year I was given the opportunity to run a more independent project examining the effects of E. Coli derived psilocybin and related tryptamines. That project has since turned into the basis of my Master's thesis, and I am excited to spend the next year or two here working on it.