©2018 by McMurray Lab

Available Positions

Research training opportunities for all career stages, including postdoctoral, doctoral, post-bac, undergraduate, and high school.
 

High School

How can you apply?

Interested students should email Dr McMurray directly.

Who should apply?

High school students who have interests in neuroscience and psychology will get the most out of their time in the lab. While future enrollment at Miami is ideal, it is not required. However, if you are planning to attend Miami, consider joining us over a summer to get a jump-start on your research before classes begin.

What can you expect?

The earlier you start conducting research, the more you can achieve, and the more competitive you'll be down the line for jobs, medical schools, and graduate schools. There's no better time to start than now! High school students can do almost everything in the lab, but cannot handle hazardous materials. Students can expect to learn the basics of animal handling, pharmacology, and neuroanatomy, all in an exciting team-oriented environment. High school students can even earn authorship on manuscripts and travel to conferences to present their work. In addition to research training, high school students can get valuable experience navigating the collegiate environment.

Undergraduate

How can you apply?

Interested undergraduates can apply using the online application form.

Who should apply?

The lab welcomes students from all majors who have a genuine interest in and passion for all aspects of neuroscience. Individuals with prior experience working with animals (even pets!) will benefit greatly from that experience. The earlier you apply in your college career the better, but we welcome applications from students of any year. Incoming freshman are encouraged to apply before even moving to campus, or through the FYRE Program.

What can you expect?

Gaining research experience at the undergraduate level is a great way to supplement your coursework and develop skills critical to med school and grad school applications. Undergraduates typically start in the lab by assisting other students with their ongoing projects. Once they've gained some experience, students can develop their own research projects, earning them authorship on manuscripts and allowing them to present their findings at conferences. Our students routinely win awards for their work, and travel to national and international conferences.

The methods used by our lab are time consuming and highly-sensitive, thus requiring extensive training and experience to use. Undergraduates must be willing to commit at least 10hrs/week to laboratory work. Not only does this ensure that your training takes place in a timely manner, but it also ensures that you will make valuable contributions to the lab and your own career. Additionally, this time commitment ensures that you become an integral member of the lab community, providing you with mentorship and guidance as you develop into a scientist. Course credit is available for students interested, but is not required.

Doctoral Students

How can you apply?

Students interested in joining can apply through the Psychology Department’s PhD program, or though the Cellular, Molecular, and Structural Biology PhD program.

While Dr McMurray always welcomes email inquiries, there is no need to email him directly to express your interest prior to submitting an application. Admission decisions are based solely on submitted applications and interviews. That being said, efforts to communicate a true commitment to the lab will certainly not go unnoticed. Applicants are encouraged to email Dr McMurray if they have a genuine question about the lab or their fit here. So, while there is no need to make contact prior to your submission to express interest or ask about ongoing research, it is recommended.

Who should apply?

The lab approaches the field of neuroscience from multiple perspectives, including behavioral, biochemical, electrophysiological, and computational. Therefore, students with a genuine interest in and passion for all aspects of neuroscience will thrive most in our lab. Successful applicants will have significant experience with animal models and behavioral assessment, and at least some experience with biochemistry, microscopy, and computational approaches. Additionally, the lab relies heavily on a collaborative research environment. Thus, individuals with excellent communication skills, who work well with others, will be much more successful than those who prefer isolation. Despite this, lab members must be able to take initiative and develop their own line of research. Lastly, we recognize that not all individuals desire careers in academia, thus the lab is fully supportive of all career directions.

What can you expect?

Graduate students will work closely with Dr. McMurray from day one to develop their own line of research within the framework of the lab. To facilitate this research, the McMurray lab is equipped with state of the art facilities and equipment, and supported by numerous core facilities, including the Center for Advanced Microscopy and Imaging and the Center for Bioinformatics and Functional Genomics. Student research is supplemented by courses that will expand both the depth and breadth of knowledge on Neuroscience and behavior. Graduate students can expect to travel to one to two conferences a year to present their research, and will ideally publish at least one manuscript a year. Graduate students are also encouraged to apply for NSF and NIH fellowships. In addition to research, graduate students will also learn state-of-the-art college teaching practices, and teach their own classes in the Psychology Department.

Postdoctoral

How can you apply?

Interested students should email Dr McMurray directly.

Who should apply?

Ideal candidates will have strong interests in the current directions of the lab, and have concrete research goals before applying. A doctoral or medical degree is required, but training can be in any number of fields, including Behavioral Neuroscience, Biology, Biochemistry, Biomedical Engineering, and others. Training in current lab methods would be helpful, but is not required. The lab has a strong emphasis on team work and mentoring. Thus, ideal candidates will work well with students and be able to balance their own research with their mentorship responsibilities.

What can you expect?

Postdocs are given a wide degree of independence in the lab, and are encouraged to develop their own independent line of research.